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nevver:

Up all night, Creative routines

time-for-maps:

History maps by JaySimons. (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

(via fuckyeahcartography)

lucienballard:

Doggerland.
A map showing Doggerland, a region of northwest Europe home to Mesolithic people before sea level rose to inundate this area and create the Europe we are familiar with today.
Map via National Geographic magazine.

lucienballard:

Doggerland.

A map showing Doggerland, a region of northwest Europe home to Mesolithic people before sea level rose to inundate this area and create the Europe we are familiar with today.

Map via National Geographic magazine.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

*1

A tour of the British Isles in accents (by Philip Barker)

*3

#dvmasterclass

A reminder of the hashtag for tonight’s data vis challenge for the Guardian Masterclass

"Computer generated visualisation, whilst a relatively new subject area has its roots in a long historical tradition of representing information using pictures in ways that combine art, science and statistics. This partial visual history includes the development of maps, astronomy, statistical graphics and computers. Further references and sources are given at the end of this section to enable you to develop your own research."

DataArt - Learning Resources

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"

At the end, I tried to make a more general point, which is of big importance to me, and which I would like to expand on in the following: You will often hear these days, that data visualization is great for “telling stories”, to “make the complex simple” or to “make boring facts exciting”. While this all true to some degree, I think it misses the greatest quality of data visualization today: to provide us with new kinds of “glasses” to see the world.

Joel de Rosnay described a fascinating, futuristic device in 1979: the macroscope. Just like the telescope allows us to see far beyond what our eyes would allow us, into the depths of space, and the microscope allows us to look at the infinitely small, a device called macroscope could allow us to investigate the infinitely complex: society, and nature.

"

Well-formed data » Worlds, not stories

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